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Vitamin D foods and the best sources of vitamin D

You should know that consuming vitamin D foods daily has a very small effect on meeting your recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin D. 

Eating average amounts of quality foods rich in vitamin D makes it very difficult to meet the RDA guidelines established by the Institute of Medicine in 2010.

But that's no reason not to do it!

Utilizing all vitamin D sources, the sun, food and supplements is an essential building block for most people. It can provide prevention, healing and long term survival from all disease, including skin cancer.


Vitamin D is produced naturally in the body from regular and moderate sun exposure.

For many of us however, a sufficient daily dose of sunshine is not feasible or even possible, especially during the winter and for those who live further north.

Having survived stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma since 1990, I have remained an advocate of a healthy diet and lifestyle for anyone who wants optimum health.

One thing I have learned is ...never be afraid of the sun …respect it!

Incorporate foods high in vitamin D into your daily, well balanced, diet of quality whole foods and use whole food supplements as necessary.

 


Let's take a look at these vitamin D foods

There are the fortified versions of foods said to be rich in vitamin D. These are processed foods that have had most or all of their original nutrients removed and then fortified with synthetically produced vitamin D and/or other nutrients.

You shouldn't depend on these processed foods to improve your health. 



Vitamin D foods from natural sources

Natural vitamin D sources would include:
•Catfish - 3oz. = 425 IU's
•Salmon - 3.5oz. = 360 IU's
•Mackerel - 3.5oz. = 345 IU's
•Sardines - canned in oil, drained, 1.75oz. = 250 IU's
•Tuna - canned in oil, 3.5oz. = 235 IU's
•Eel - cooked, 3.5oz. = 200 IU's
•A whole egg = about 20 IU's
•Beef liver - cooked, 3.5oz. = 15 IU's
•Fish liver oils - like cod liver oil, 1 tbsp. = 1360 IU's
•Mushrooms - Shiitake, dried without sunshine, 100 grams = 14 IU's   ---   sunlight dried, 100 grams = 500 IU's


Nutritional content of vitamin D is not required to be listed on the label on products in the US unless the product has been fortified with this nutrient.

As much as possible you should choose wild caught fish over farm raised and avoid fish imported from Asian countries, especially China.

Choose eggs from free range raised chickens and as much as possible choose organic mushrooms and vegetables.

There’s still no guarantee you will be getting all the nutrients that should be in these foods, but hopefully you will be avoiding the harmful toxins and chemicals.

 

If we don’t get enough sunshine and we're not eating enough Vitamin D foods in our daily diet, then it would be advisable to be taking vitamin supplements every day, being sure that they provide an adequate dosage of vitamin D.

A good online source for vitamin supplements I have found is Vitacost.

It's important to maintain a proper level of vitamin D3 for building a strong immune system.

Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that eating a poor diet with lots of supplements will make you healthier.

It won’t!

You must be eating a healthy, well balanced diet and only using the supplements to make up for the lack that still probably exists.

The only way to be sure about your vitamin D level is to have your blood tested.  

 

Combined vitamin D sources as recommended by the Institute of Medicine on Nov. 30, 2010

Remember, this is the Institute of Medicine and they show lower amounts than what most holistic doctors would tell you. I like 5000 IU's a day, but if you're getting the supply recommended below, you're doing above average, ...pretty good!

• 0-6 months of age: 1000 IU

• 6-12 months of age: 1500 IU

• 1-3 years of age: 2500 IU

• 4-8 years of age: 3000 IU

• 9- 71+ years of age: 4000 IU

• Pregnant/lactating: 4000 IU

Use the sun as a source when you can, but NEVER, NEVER over do it.

Eat vitamin D foods and include supplements. There are never any guarantees, but you do stand a chance of living a longer and better quality life when you take control of your own health.

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Links related to Vitamin D Foods:

Vitamin D Deficiency Symptoms
Causes of Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D Dosage
Vitamin D Overdose Symptoms
Vitamin D Sunlight
Vitamin D Facts

 
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Amelanotic Melanoma
Updated July 1, 2015



"MELANOMA : “NO BIG DEAL ” IT'S JUST SKIN CANCER!

Hi! My name is Nick and I’m 56 yrs. old and this is part of my story. Let me tell you, I was like a lot of people out there and I had no idea that skin cancer was anything bad. I had Basal cell back in 2007, but that was no big deal and it was removed and that was the end of that. No one told me that it was a type of skin cancer (I looked it up on my computer). But still no big deal, it would not kill me.
But I did know the word "Melanoma"....." --by Nick

Read more of Nick's Story

Scared to Death!!! - by Shelly

Our Cancer Stories are so similar, mine and Gary's! - by Valerie  



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Bottom Line
The Weather Channel has done well posting this information and photos to help you spot skin cancer, including melanoma.
It can be hard to spot, even for a professional.
The bottom line is to get an expert's opinion about any suspicious mole or lesion on your skin. If necessary, get a second opinion  and/or request a biopsy. it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Don’t put your very life at risk!